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Media Contact

Please contact us on +64 4 472 4250
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Email Us media@aa.org.nz

Media policy

Throughout the world, favourable media coverage has been one of the principal means of bringing alcoholics into recovery and saving lives and families.

For many years, we in A.A. have appreciated the support we have received from those who have respected the anonymity of people who attend A.A. meetings. This has assisted in saving countless lives of people who may be afraid to seek help for fear of being identified.

Anonymity lies at the heart of our Fellowship and assures our members that their recovery will be private. Often, the active alcoholic will avoid any source of help which might reveal his or her identity. We respectfully ask for co-operation in protecting the anonymity of people who attend or may our meetings at the public level.

When presenting A.A. members or anybody who attends one of our meetings:

  • you use first names only
  • you do not use pictures in which their faces may be recognized.

In accordance with our Traditions, Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues.
Alcoholics Anonymous is also not affiliated with any other organisation, although many have adapted A.A.’s Twelve Steps for their own use.
Alcoholics Anonymous is self-supporting, declining outside contributions.
Alcoholics Anonymous is non-professional, offering only the voluntary support of one alcoholic helping another.

Stories and Articles

Secret drinking - in the toilet

Young man (23) agreed to get help for his alcohol problem after becoming abusive to others.

One Day at a Time

At 32yrs old when I come to A.A. I was desperate, suffering from a disease that I didn’t really know about or understand.

I’m Alive Today

My name is ... and I’m an alcoholic, 12 years have gone by and I’m basking in the joys that a clean and sober life has given me.

The "Man"

I had my first drink at about 7 years old...

A New Life

In 1999 I entered the University of Canterbury, aged 19. By the end of the year I had told everyone I’d decided to leave.

Press release for the AA Survey undertaken 2016

First NZ Alcoholics Anonymous Survey in Over Ten Years Shows Current Trends in Recovery